Tuesday, 17 March 2015

Happy All Snakes Day!


 It is said that St Patrick banished all snakes from Ireland, but Patrick's expulsion of the snakes from Ireland was an early example of eccleciastical spin: there were none there in the first place. Post-glacial ie since before the last Ice Age Ireland never had snakes, as on insular "New Zealand, Iceland, Greenland and Antarctica.

 A quintessential symbol of fertility and renewal, the snake has long been associated with Goddess worship. The tale of the "snake" leaving Ireland illustrates a Christian longing for the eradication of the ancient and benevolent goddess worship that once dominated Ireland. The serpent was a symbol of the Irish Pagans and Druids then and it was they that St Patrick drove out of Ireland, by threatening them with death if they didn't convert to christianity and actually killed many Druid priests who refused to convert.




The Wild Hunt has this to say;

''For some modern Pagans (whether Irish or not), St. Patrick’s Day isn’t a day of celebrations, as they see Patrick, famously attributed with converting Ireland to Christianity, as committing something akin to cultural genocide.

“The “snakes” that Patrick drove out of Ireland were the Druidic priests, who had serpents tattooed on their forearms. Celebrating him is like celebrating Stalin or Hitler.”

Pagan author Isaac Bonewits called the day “All Snakes Day”, and penned songs calling for the return of the “snakes” that Patrick is famously attributed with driving out, since many claim the “snakes” are actually a metaphor for Pagans (Ireland hasn’t had real snakes in it since the last ice age).''  more here.

The meanings of the other symbols of Ireland;
Green is the colour of Ireland, of mysterious deeds, of an awakening earth, of the mist that lies in the hollows foretelling the coming of spring, of the shoots whose green colour deepens as they stretch toward the sun.
The four-leaf clover represents the solar-worshipping invaders of Ireland, the Celts and their crowd.
The shamrock refers to the importance of triplism to Ireland's indigenous tribes as well as the triple worship of the Goddess of Ireland Ana (also Aine and Dana) in her aspects of maid, mother and crone. The symbol was eventually written into the legend of St. Patrick to describe the Trinity...


Celtic Druid Triad from Ireland's Druidschool


Be Pagan Once Again!
© 1972, 2001 c.e. by Isaac Bonewits

When childhild's fire was in my blood, I dreamed of ancient dreemen,
Against the Church who boldly stood, as Pagans and as Heathen.
And then I prayed I yet might see, the Druids in the glen,
And Ireland long the churches' toy, be Pagan once again!
Be Pagan once again, be Pagan once again,
And Ireland long the churches' toy, be Pagan once again!

The Old Gods only sleep you know, although betrayed and slandered.
They guarded us from every woe, and blessed each crop and fine herd.
Then Patrick, he drove the snakes away, and brought the churches in.
'Twas a bloody poor bargain, I would say -- let's be Pagan once again!
Be Pagan once again, be Pagan once again,
'Twas a bloody poor bargain, I would say -- let's be Pagan once again!

And ever since that wretched day, when first Ireland went Christian,
We've suffered woe in every way, with our freedom made the worst "sin".
They set us at each other's throats, to murder kith and kin.
Too long we've been their starving goats -- let's be Pagan once again!
Be Pagan once again, be Pagan once again,
Too long we've been their starving goats -- let's be Pagan once again!

Both Catholic and Protestant, led us round by our noses,
Distracting from the deadly scent, of England's bleedin' roses!
Kick every preacher 'cross the sea, burn out their golden dens.
It's the only way we'll ever be free -- let's be Pagan once again!
Be Pagan once again, be Pagan once again,
It's the only way we'll ever be free -- let's be Pagan once again!




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