Thursday, 15 December 2011

Auld Lang Syne



A short rendition of Auld Lang Syne
equivalent to the first verse and chorus.
Auld Lang Syne is a Scots poem written by Robert Burns in 1788 and set to the tune of a traditional folk song, its traditional use being to celebrate the start of the New Year at the stroke of midnight.

When Burns became a Freemason at the age of 23 he quickly absorbed the symbolism of the Craft and for him, Auld Lang Syne is a heartfelt expression of his love of mankind and his ideal of International Brotherhood.


The dance routine is to form a circle in which everyone is equidistant from the center, demonstrating they are all equal.
At the beginning of the song all stand with hands by their sides, symbolizing they are relative strangers.
The early verses should be sung (or hummed) very softly as everyone reflects on both memories of earlier times and on those who have since passed to the Grand Lodge Above.
When they come to the last verse, "And there's a hand, my trusty frier (friend)...", each then extends his right hand of fellowship to the person on his left, then the left hand to the person on his right.
This symbolizes two things: firstly, that they are crossing their hearts; secondly, that they automatically form a smaller and more intimate circle of friendship.
Now they have an unbroken chain of of close friends.
The tempo should then rise and, to the tapping of feet, all enthusiastically sing the final chorus.

AULD LANG SYNE
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind
Should auld acquaintance be forgot,
And auld lang syne
[CHORUS]
For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindess yet
For auld lang syne
And surely ye ‘ll be your pint’ stowp
And surely I ‘ll be mine
And we ‘ll take a cup o’ kindness yet
For auld lang syne
[CHORUS]
We twa hae run about the braes
And pou’d the gowans fine
But we ‘ve wander’d monie a weary fit
Sin’ auld lang syne.
[CHORUS]
We twa hae paidl’d in the burn
Frae morning sun till dine
But seas between us braid hae roar’d
Sin’ auld lang syne
[CHORUS]
And there’s a hand, my trusty fiere
And gie ‘s a hand o’ thine
And we ‘ll tak a right guid-willie waught
For auld lang syne
[CHORUS]

For auld lang syne, my dear
For auld lang syne
We’ll tak a cup o’ kindess yet
For auld lang syne
……………………….
English Version:
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And never brought to mind
Should old acquaintance be forgot,
And days of long ago
[CHORUS:]
For old long ago, my dear
For old long ago,
We will take a cup of kindness yet
For old long ago
We two have run about the hillsides
And pulled the daisies fine,
But we have wandered many a weary foot
For old long ago
[CHORUS]
We two have paddled in the stream
From noon until dinner time,
But seas between us broad have roared
Since old long ago
And there is a hand, my trusty friend,
And give us a hand of yours,
And we will take a goodwill draught
For old long ago
[CHORUS]
And surely you will pay for your pint,
And surely I will pay for mine
And we will take a cup of kindness yet
For old long ago.
[CHORUS]
* * *
As well as celebrating the New Year, Auld Lang Syne is very widely used to symbolize other 'endings/new beginnings' - including farewells, funerals and graduations.
In Scotland, it is often sung at the end of a céilidh or a dance and in many Burns Clubs, it is sung at the end of the Burns supper, on or near the poet's birthday, 25 January, sometimes also known as Robert Burns Day or Burns Nicht.


Take A Cup Of Kindness Where'er Ye Go ~

1 comment:

  1. This is so nice. When I think of this song it reminds me of WWII ... my Dad and Mom told me many a story about those terrible times and this was one of the songs that they sang. I really appreciate your blog and love to keep coming back and learning a thing or two.

    Bright Blessings and Happiness to ALL !

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